Silent Spring Deadly Autumn of the Vietnam War
Silent Spring Deadly Autumn of the Vietnam War
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About Author

 
Getting Ready to Leave South Vietnam - U.S. Army Motor Pool - 1969

Getting Ready to Leave South Vietnam - U.S. Army Motor Pool - 1969

Award Presentation

Award Presentation

about the author

 The author was stationed in South Vietnam for almost three years—from September 1966 through June 1969. While there he earned the rank of Staff Sergeant E-6 and awarded the Army Commendation Medal by the Secretary of the Army Stanley Resor. Shortly after being discharged from the Army, in August of 1975, he was appointed to the Teaneck Police Department as a law enforcement officer.  During his police career, he attended Fairleigh Dickenson University’s Edward Williams College where he earned an Associate in Arts Degree with honors. He has also completed training programs at many law enforcement educational facilities such as John Jay College of Criminal Justice, the NJ State Police Training Academy and the New England Institute of Law Enforcement and Management (Babson College). In addition to his educational accomplishments, he is a certified State of New Jersey Police Training Instructor.

Initially, writing a book about the war or being an author was the further thing from his mind. However, shortly after returning from Vietnam, his father urged him to file a disability claim with the Department of Veterans Affairs (DVA) for medical problems he had experienced during his service. He began the process without much enthusiasm and quickly got sidelined by his new civilian life. Little did he realize that he wouldn’t re-visit his disability claims until after watching a speech given by President Barack Obama on the 50th anniversary of the Vietnam War. He’s still not quite sure what happened that day, but after listening to the president, he felt an urgency to commit himself to investigate the causal link between his exposures to Agent Orange and the myriad health problems plaguing not only his life but the lives of many other Vietnam veterans.

When he started his investigative journey into Agent Orange, he never suspected what he would discover. But, he quickly learned veterans were exposed too much more than just one pesticide. The deeper his exploration took him, and the more he understood about all the lives which had been taken and damaged by the rampant use of pesticides during the war; the more determined he became to try to set the record right. So, starting with the death of his friend and fellow veteran, Larry White the concept for Silent Spring - Deadly Autumn of the Vietnam War was born, and a reluctant writer emerged out of sheer exasperation and sorrow.